Germany Women’s National Football Team Players, Squad, Stadium, Kit, and much more

The Germany women’s national soccer team (German: Deutsche Fußballnationalmannschaft der Frauen) represents Germany in international women’s soccer. The team is governed by the German Football Federation (DFB).

Here in this article, you will get to know about Germany Women’s National Football Team 2022/23 Players, Squad, History, Stadium, Nickname, Kits, and more.

Germany Women’s National Football Team Profile Summary

Nickname(s)DFB-Frauenteam (DFB Women’s Team)
DFB-Frauen (DFB Women)
AssociationDeutscher Fußball-Bund (DFB)
ConfederationUEFA
Head coachMartina Voss-Tecklenburg
CaptainAlexandra Popp
Most capsBirgit Prinz (214)
Top scorerBirgit Prinz (128)
FIFA codeGER

About Germany Women’s National Football Team

The German women’s national soccer team (German: Deutsche Fußballnationalmannschaft der Frauen) represents Germany in international women’s soccer. The team is governed by the German Football Federation (DFB).

The German team is one of the most successful in women’s football. They are two-time world champions, having won the 2003 and 2007 tournaments. The team have won eight of the thirteen UEFA European Championships, clinching six consecutive titles between 1995 and 2013. They, along with the Netherlands, are one of the two nations that have won both the women’s and men’s European tournaments.

Germany won Olympic gold in 2016, after three consecutive bronze medals at the Women’s Olympic Football Tournament, finishing third in 2000, 2004, and 2008. Birgit Prinz holds the record for most appearances and is the all-time leading goalscorer of the team. Prinz has also set international records; she has received the FIFA World Player of the Year award three times and is the second joint top scorer at the Women’s World Cup.

Germany Women’s National Football Team History

Early History

In 1955, the DFB decided to ban women’s football at all its West German clubs. In its explanation, the DFB cited that “this combat sport is fundamentally alien to the nature of women” and that “body and soul would inevitably suffer damage.” Furthermore, the “display of the body violates etiquette and decency.” Despite this ban, more than 150 unofficial international matches were played in the 1950s and 1960s. On October 30, 1970, the ban on women’s football was lifted at the annual DFB convention.

1982-1994: Difficult beginnings and first European titles

In September 1982, Bisanz organized two scout training courses from which he selected a squad of 16 players. The team’s first international match took place on November 10, 1982 in Koblenz. Following the tradition of the men’s team, Switzerland was chosen as West Germany’s first opponent. Doris Kresimon scored the first international goal in the 25th minute. In the second half, 18-year-old Silvia Neid contributed two goals in a 5-1 win; Neid later became an assistant coach in 1996 and a head coach in 2005.

With five draws and one loss, West Germany failed to qualify for the inaugural 1984 European Championship, finishing third in the qualifying group. At first, Bisanz’s main goal was to close the gap with the Scandinavian countries and Italy, then the strongest teams in Europe. He emphasized basic skills training and the need for an effective youth program. Starting in 1985, Bisanz increasingly called on younger players, but initially had little success with this concept, as West Germany again failed to qualify for the 1987 European Championship final.

2003–present: Two consecutive World Cup titles

At the 2003 Women’s World Cup in the United States, Germany was drawn into a group with Canada, Japan, and Argentina. After winning all three group games, the German team defeated Russia 7-1 in the quarterfinals, setting up another showdown with the United States. Germany’s Kerstin Garefrekes scored after 15 minutes and goalkeeper Silke Rottenberg made several key saves.

In the dying minutes of the semi-final, Maren Meinert and Birgit Prinz sealed the 3-0 victory. On October 12, 2003, Germany faced Sweden in the World Cup final in Los Angeles. The Scandinavians took the lead before the break, but Maren Meinert equalized shortly after the break. The match went into extra time, where Nia Künzer headed the game-winning golden goal in the 98th minute to claim Germany’s first Women’s World Cup title. Birgit Prinz was awarded as the best player and top scorer of the tournament.

With victories over China and Mexico, the German team finished first in their group at the 2004 Summer Olympics. They beat Nigeria 2-1 in the quarterfinals but suffered a 1-2 loss in the semifinals to the United States. after the extension. In the match for third place, Germany defeated Sweden 1–0 on a goal by Renate Lingor, earning the team’s second Olympic bronze medal.

Germany Women’s National Football Team 2022/2023 players Squad?

GOALKEEPERPOSAGEHTWT
Ann Katrin BergerG325’10”138 lbs
Merle FrohmsG285’8″132 lbs
Maria Luisa GrohsG215’10”
Stina JohannesG235’9″
Almuth SchultG325’10”160 lbs
DEFENDERPOSAGEHTWT
Sara Doorsoun-KhajehD315’6″127 lbs
Alicia-Sophie GudorfD21
Kathrin HendrichD305’8″121 lbs
Sophia KleinherneD225’6″
Carolin SimonD305’4″119 lbs
Marie Joelle WedemeyerD265’6″
MIDFIELDERPOSAGEHTWT
Linda DallmannM285’2″114 lbs
Jana FeldkampM245’6″
Chantal HagelM24
Svenja HuthM325’4″119 lbs
Lena LattweinM235’9″
Lina MagullM285’5″119 lbs
Janina MingeM235’6″
Sjoeke NuskenM225’8″
Maximiliane RallM295’10”
Felicitas RauchM265’5″
Elisa SenssM25
FORWARDPOSAGEHTWT
Etonam Nicole AnyomiF235’6″
Jule BrandF20
Klara BuehlF225’7″
Laura FreigangF255’7″
Melissa KosslerF22
Paulina Kate KrumbiegelF22
Lena OberdorfF215’8″
Alexandra PoppF315’8″149 lbs

Germany Women’s National Football Team Home Stadium

The German soccer team does not have a national stadium. Like the men, the women’s team plays its home games in different stadiums throughout the country. Until June 2011, they played in 87 different German cities. The majority of home games have been in Osnabrück with six games, followed by Ulm (five games) and Bochum, Kaiserslautern, Koblenz, Lüdenscheid, Rheine, Siegen and Weil am Rhein (three games each). The first home game in former East Germany was played in Aue in May 1991.

Germany Womens National Football Team Home Stadium
Germany Women's National Football Team Players, Squad, Stadium, Kit, and much more 4

Germany Women’s National Football Team Kit

The German women’s soccer team wears white jerseys with black shorts and white socks, following the tradition of the German men’s national team: black and white are the colors of Prussia. The current swap kit is all dark green. In the past, Germany has also used green jerseys with white shorts and green socks as their away kit, as well as a red and black kit, with black shorts and red socks.

Germany Womens National Football Team Kit
Germany Women's National Football Team Players, Squad, Stadium, Kit, and much more 5

Kit sponsorship

Adidas

Germany Women’s National Football Team world rankings

Current2 1 (9 December 2022)
Highest1 (October 2003 – 2007, December 2014 – June 2015, March 2017)
Lowest5 (June 2022)

Germany Women’s National Football Team trophies

FIFA Women’s World Cup

  • Champions: 2003, 2007
  • Runners-up: 1995
  • Fourth place: 1991, 2015

Conclusion

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Source: FootballArroyo.co.uk

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